Friday, December 7, 2018

Warm Up with the TEA book...SUPERFOODS is Coming in 11 Days!

NEW Tea Book Unveiled in December! The Gift with Heart and Warmth

By Cal Orey

Did you know wellness in a cup is in your kitchen cupboards? Tea, much like a best friend, is the versatile superfood that can be enjoyed as an amazing constant home cure, an age-fighting treatment, relaxing beauty remedy, household cleaner, and even infused in your favorite dishes--from Strawberry Banana Tea Muffins to Scallops in Black Tea Marinade!

As noted on the back cover of The Healing Powers of TeaA Complete Guide To Nature's Special Remedy (Citadel Press, Kensington)--
It picks you up and calms you down, warms you and refreshes you. With black, white, green, and herbal varieties, there's a tea for every taste, and now this time-honored superfood is trending as the drink of choice for health-conscious people of all ages and cultures.


Welcome to Tea Land!
This fascinating book boils down the rich history of tea--as well as the ever-expanding list of health and weight loss benefits found in its leaves.  

But this special one-of-a-kind tea book does so much more. It's sweetened with lively up close and very personal home and family to on-the-road stories with twists, turns, and real feelings (bonding with people and pets of all ages with tea as a vehicle) paired with inspiring legends about tea from yesteryear.

Discover how tea is a drink that goes back in history as well as the center for tea parties--stirs the imagination for the young at home and serves up exciting teas and treats in beautiful tea rooms for older people young at heart. (page 19)

Find out exactly how far people, perhaps like you, too, will go to get a cup of tea (a variety of types) no matter where you are or who you're with--man, woman, a group of people or dog--for survival's sake! (page 136)
Get the latest information from tea experts on how the superfood can tackle anxiety and depression during life's ups and downs--and big family losses linked to pain, grief, anger, acceptance, and a comeback to move on. (pages 145) 

Feel thrills and novelty vicariously experiencing adventures in traveling through wilderness up and down the West Coast, Midwest, Deep South, Northeast and Canada and cultural shock in new places but always tea soothing and part of the memory.  Alone with a canine companion, a new love, or in the company of wise elderly women and men--tea is a drink to cherish, a drink that bonds people. (page 77-78)

Stir up over 50 home cures to give yourself more energy, less stress--and feel younger, more happiness, vim and vigor while traveling or at home! (pages 155-156)

After a 3000 mile flight plan, imagine your fantasy-come-true final destination and you can relax with a cuppa tea and sense of adventure in a foreign country after the trials and tribulations in the process of getting there (plane, train, bus, cab, shuttle bus) and feeling homesick but tea helped calm the pain. (pages 191-192)
Enjoy super comforting and tea-licious recipes like Warm Scones with Jam and Assorted Finger Sandwiches. (pages 225-226; Tea Menu, pages 238-272)


And so much more! Enjoy the intriguing and unforgettable tales that reveal feelings of joy, loneliness, love, longing, security and comfort--all tea-inspired in The Healing Powers of Tea--#6 in the Healing Powers series.  
This very special, intimate book is full of new research, new recipes, and new home cures, penned from the tea-loving author's heart and soul pairs well with the upcoming gift size mass market The Healing Powers of Honey, Feb. 27!  Also, The Healing Powers of Tea is the perfect companion with The Healing Powers of Coffee and The Healing Powers of Chocolate. The collection is available at fine bookstores (on and offline) and ready for you December 26!

Sunday, December 2, 2018

Earthquake! What Kitty Knows


What Kitty Knows
ESP, Superior Senses, and Feline Intuition

Did You Know?  After a disaster, animals need comforting too. Comfort your pet with kind words and lots of pats or hugs. If possible, according to the American Humane Society, provide a safe and quiet environment even if it’s not their own home.

Whether it’s ESP, superior senses, feline intuition or a change in routine, your cat may sense danger, and you should know about it.

            At noon on a stormy spring day in Austin, Texas, several household cats started acting strangely. “I was in bed watching the weather channel on TV,” recalls cat owner Janet Shon. “My cats wanted to hide underneath the covers.” The heavy rains and howling winds continued, causing panic in her house full of pets. Eventually, she put them into carriers to calm them, and took cover under the stairwell. “Usually, my cats don’t mind being in the crates during bad weather,” she says, “but this time, they were chatting nonstop and wanted to be next to me.”
            Several hours later, on May 27, 1997, an extremely rare and dangerous tornado (classified as an F-5), with winds measuring over 260 mph, touched down 40 miles to the North of Shon in Jarrell, Texas. Twenty-seven people died in Jarrell. Multiple tornadoes also ripped through the Austin area, killing two people. “It took the roof off the Albertsons’ store,” says Shon with awe. She and her cats survived without a scratch.
            What made Shon’s cats react in such a way? Some say it’s ESP (extra sensory perception), or a sixth sense. Others claim cats aren’t gifted, just blessed with well-developed or heightened senses—scent, sound and sight, that are far superior to our own.
            However you see it, cats have earned their supernatural reputation throughout history. In ancient Egypt, felines were worshipped as gods, and killing a cat was a crime punishable by death. Even modern society gives credence to the idea that cats “know” things. During World War 11, “British families found that their cats were the best warning system for impending danger,” notes Dale Koppel, author of Amazing But True Cat Facts. “They showed unmistakable signs that something was about to happen even before the air sirens were sounded. Their hair would stand on end, or they’d spit or wail. Some would head straight for the nearest shelter.”
            Many people who live through terrible disasters—hurricanes, tornadoes, fires or earthquakes—believe their cats knew something before these disasters struck. But whether or not cats really predict danger is still an open debate. So, what will you do the next time Felix starts acting strange? Will you roll your eyes, or head for high ground? Read on and decide for yourself.

IS IT ESP?
  “Cats have an extraordinary ability to sense imminent earthquakes, usually ten to fifteen minutes before they occur,” explains Ed Lucaire, author of The Cat Lover’s Book of Facts: A Felicitous Look At Felines. “They exhibit nervous behavior such as pawing or scratching at doors and windows, and above-average concern with the safety of kittens.”
            In fact, California Geologist Jim Berkland has turned to lost cats and dogs to stranded whales and wayward birds to predict other big earthquakes, such as the infamous 7.1 Loma Prieta, California earthquake of October 17, 1989, which rumbled through the San Francisco Bay Area for 15 seconds and shook Candlestick Park in the middle of the World Series. Sixty-seven people died and more than 600 people were injured. He believes some cats hold mysterious psychic powers as well.  


FOUR-LEGGED WEATHER FORECASTERS

            So, what about hurricane warnings?  While scientists use wind patterns, barometric pressure, sea surface temperatures and other climate factors to predict hurricanes, fishermen watch their cats. In fact, cats have long been considered good luck on ships for their ability to ward off storms, sea monsters and ghosts. Europeans of the past centuries believed cats “knew” the way home and would reveal the direction by sleeping on the side of the ship that was closest to port.
            Gail Beecher, a veteran cat breeder from Needville, Texas, got a special warning before Tropical Storm Frances hit the Texas coast on September 9, 1998. Some of Beecher’s pregnant cats began to go into early labor. “When the barometer shifts during bad weather my cats always go into labor early,” she says. “I knew the storm was coming this way.” Wind speeds reached a maximum of 65 mph, and one person died due to the intense flooding of the Gulf Coast.
            “All cats are extraordinary sensitive to even the smallest changes in the weather,” writes Koppel who claims, “you can throw away your thermometers and stop watching weather forecasts on TV.” A resident of Kansas City, Missouri agrees, “I have noticed before a tornado (during thunder, wind, hail and lightning) animals do lie close to the ground and pant. The bigger and fatter the dog and cat, the more it seems to affect them. Also, they sometimes put their head on the floor.”
            According to Koppel, French fishermen watch their cats’ body language to get a weather report. “They watch their cats closely to predict weather changes,” he says. “Rain? Watch for your cat to pass her paw behind the ear during grooming. Windy? Your cat will clean her nose. Low tide? Wide pupils, of course. When will the bad weather end? When your cat twists and turns.”
            Sound silly? Perhaps not, says John C. Wright, PhD, certified animal behaviorist from Macon, Georgia, and author of Is Your Cat Crazy: Solutions from the Casebook of a Cat Therapist, who’s fascinated by it all. However, to be certain that this is a reliable weather source, Wright says, a group of cats and their body positions should be examined carefully in a weather study for conclusive scientific evidence. In other words, scientific studies are needed.


A CAT’S GOOD SENSE

Neil Tenzer, DVM, of Miami, Florida recalls that his five cats felt Hurricane Andrew’s fury before it arrived on August 25, 1992, with winds of up to 150 mph. Amid the chaos of his family putting shutters on the windows and gathering canned food and candles, explains Tenzer, his cats grew curious and upset about the change in their environment. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), this category 4 hurricane caused 58 deaths and approximately $27 billion in damage. “It’s not that they predicted the hurricane—but they certainly sensed it was on its way,” Tenzer says.
            A former North Carolina resident agrees. She was in the path of Hugo as the hurricane headed toward Charlotte in 1989. Hurricane Hugo passed directly over Charleston, South Carolina, on September 21, as a category 5 storm with wind speeds in excess of 135 mph and a storm surge of nearly 20 feet. Hugo caused 57 deaths on the U.S. mainland (mostly in North and South Carolina) and 29 deaths in the U.S. Virgin Islands, according to NOAA records. Total damage: $9 billion. “I had indoor cats and barn cats there,” she recalls. Apparently, her cats share the same reaction to all severe storms. “Barn cats always seem to find shelter well ahead of a storm.” 
            Some argue that extrasensory perception is really just super senses. In the case of earthquakes, for example, cats may be sensitive to the earth’s vibrations and sound waves right before an earthquake hits, says geophysicist Bruce Presgrave, from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in Golden, Colorado. Other people suggest that cats are able to detect minute shifts in the earth’s magnetic field or in the earth’s magnetic field or in the earth’s static electricity, which occur before a jolt.
           
REACTING TO CHANGE                

            Most people recognize that cats (and dogs) like structure and don’t like change too much. Perhaps felines don’t “sense” danger, but are instead reacting to change in routine or environment. “It may be novelty of those particular cues, rather than the cat knows that this is danger,” says Wright. And often, it’s fear of the unknown. “Fear motivates cats to act out,” he adds. “When they can’t cope with the stimulus they go emotional on us. Sometimes these emotional responses lead cats to run over and over their escape routes or make some noise to get out.”
           Deputy Director Gary Grice of the National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma, relies on complex scientific theories and computers to forecast powerful twisters. However, “there is a possibility that animals react to the significant pressure changes of the atmosphere before a tornado hits,” he concedes.    The question remains, can feline barometers detect the difference between an impending hurricane or tornado? “Since there are similar weather phenomena associate with tornadoes and hurricanes, you’re likely to get the same reaction out of cats because they are reacting to the same kinds of things,” explains Wright.
            “Although there’s research that’s ongoing in different areas, when your life is on the line and you have to depend on something so you get out of harm’s way, the clear answer now is to heed the warnings that are issued by the National Weather Service and do what they say,” says Grice. He goes on to say that “scientists do not have a 100 percent track record for predicting disasters.” As for cats, Grice believes that are not perfect predictors either since it’s not known if they are responding to disaster precursors or if they are behaving strangely for other reasons. “Our success rate is much, much higher than what you’re getting from animals,” he says.
            Meanwhile, Shon wonders about her cats’ behavior before the deadly Texas tornado. Did they sense the nearby funnel clouds on the day of destruction? Was there a change in smell or pressure, or did Shon’s own behavior affect the cats? We’ll never really know. But at least some disaster experts are now realizing that some cats can sense impending gloom and doom. The question of whether cats can predict a cataclysm hours or days in advance requires more research.
            But since scientists admit they aren’t able to reliably predict earthquakes, fires, hurricanes and tornadoes, is it really so far-fetched to monitor cats and dogs?
            Cat experts advise cat owners to do just that. “The cat’s first instinct is survival, and cats are the best survival machines Mother Nature has ever developed,” concludes Eric Swanson, author of Hero Cats: True Stories of Daring Feline Deeds. Whether cats are gifted with some kind of sight, or not—felines continue to inspire a spiritual nature that cat-lovers respond to. What they actually see, and what we see in their eyes is impossible to say.
            Consider what the late Jeane Dixon wrote in her book Do Cats Have ESP? “In the dark, [cats’ mysterious eyes] seem to hover alone, disembodied and shining brightly on the darkest of nights. Ancient people believed the cat had captured a piece of the sun which it called up at will to see in the dark.”

Get Prepared

No matter how smart and intuitive cats are, they can only protect themselves so far, says a spokesperson for the disaster services of The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS). So, plan ahead. Here are some tips:
1.If you evacuate, do not leave your cat [or dog] behind.
2. Cats should wear a collar and up-to-date I.D. tag at all times.
3. Have a backup plan in case you aren’t home when disaster hits. Contact friends and family members now to ask if they would be willing to get your cat and meet you at a prearranged place.
4. Find out where you can go or board your cat for temporary housing. Most emergency shelters will not allow cats.

5. Pack a disaster kit for your cat that includes food and water, bowls, leashes, carriers, a list of phone numbers, vaccination records, required medications, cat litter and a cat box. 

Saturday, December 1, 2018

The Day After a Major Quake Strikes


 After Your World is Rocked

 It was a hot Indian summer day that I will never forget. I still have memories of the eerie sound of the quake, like a freight train roaring through my San Carlos bungalow, as the windows rattled and the floor buckled. I thought, “The world is ending.”
            After the quake hit, I grabbed the dog leash and hit the streets with my yellow Lab, Carmella. Car alarms and no people were outside. I went back indoors and sat down only to be greeted by a strong aftershock—and countless aftershocks followed for weeks.
 My eyes were glued to the TV (now back on and put on the floor) for days, watching the amazing damage to the places I’ve lived, places I love. At night, I slept in the living room cuddled up with my two cats and dog. I was afraid to sleep in my bed—the place I was when the quake hit. Like many people who chose to sleep outside, Alex, my orange-and-white super sensitive feline was too spooked to come inside the house—day or night. For weeks I kept the light on, a dog leash and shoes beneath me. I was trying to cope with the 7.1 monster World Series earthquake that rumbled through the San Francisco Bay Area on October 17, 1989 and rocked our world in 15 seconds.
As a native Californian, I had endured a 6.2 quake In Morgan Hill—but this shaker affected me and my pets that sensed it coming. My dog had been acting restless the week prior. My Siamese cat refused to come indoors for two months—since August when a foreshock happened. And my food-loving cat Alex did not eat the morning of the unforgettable quake.
Geologist Jim Berkland Predicted
the SF Quake 4 days before--published
in the Gilroy Dispatch
            As an earthquake survivor and sensitive—who gets cues, including messages, hunches, bad vibes, and dreams—I can tell you people and pets who endure catastrophic Earth events—often deal with body and mind signs before disaster hits. Afterwards, sleeplessness, depression, loss, anxiety, and flashbacks haunt you. So how in the world do super sensitive people and companion animals deal with all the drama of catastrophic events around the globe?

MEET THE SUPER SENSITIVE

Who are the sensitives, anyhow? “Super sensitives are a very special part of the human and pet population who are keenly aware and perceptive of their environment. Sensitive people are highly intuitive and empathetic,” explains Kyra Mesich, Psy.D., author of The Sensitive Person’s Survival Guide.
Mesich adds: “Sensitive people are more receptive and perceptive of their environment. Sensitive people [and pets] are not weak or broke. They are the antennae of the human population who are capable of picking up and broadcasting the information we all need to know for our survival.” Still, people choose to tune out sensitive beings because sensing oncoming danger can be a scary thing.


COPING WITH IT ALL

            Not only is experiencing Earth’s changes and disaster frightening, it can set up a scenario of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)—especially for super sensitives; it’s what war veterans deal with after the real-life nightmare happens.
            “The severity of the PTSD and number of symptoms one experiences vary depending on your background, your personality, and the nature of the trauma. While some will experience more and some fewer symptoms, it makes no difference how strong or capable you think you are. If you are traumatized, you will experience at least some symptoms,” notes Anxiety, Phobias & Panic author and therapist Reneau Z. Peurifoy. Also, you don’t have to experience the trauma firsthand to experience PTSD symptoms, adds Peurifoy.
            People who witnessed and survived the December 26, 2004 Indian-Ocean tsunami recall the devastating event. They remember seeing deceased bodies of humans and pet that washed up on the beach. And the images linger on.

LIFE GOES ON

            If you or someone you know experiences PTSD after an earthquake, tsunami, wildfire, or hurricane, and man-made disaster, including the 2010 Gulf oil spill [affecting wildlife] Peurifoy recommends using these statements to help you deal and continue living life:
I am a normal person who has been in an abnormal situation.
Sometimes my mind takes snapshots of the disaster to try to make sense of something that is actually senseless.
The disaster is over. It’s in the past.
I’m safe now.
            The bottom line: Dr. Mesich says it best: “The influences upon us include not just other people but animals on Earth. We are tied to our home planet. We can open our hearts to realize just how connected we are to our environment, nature and Earth itself.” It’s time to tune into your intuitive powers—and be prepared for signs of Earth changes. Are you listening?